10-year-old Finn has been falling asleep easily for 2 years, thanks to Somnox

10-year-old Finn has been falling asleep easily for 2 years, thanks to Somnox

10-year-old Finn had long term difficulties with falling asleep. He was often still awake at 11:30 PM. Ever since he started using Somnox, it has become much easier for him to fall asleep. Finn, together with his mother Karin, share their experiences with the Somnox Breathe and Sleep Companion. 

  • Name: Finn
  • Age: 10           
  • Grade: Sixth grade elementary school
  • Hobbies: Playing tennis, the violin, and Pokémon games

How was your sleep before Somnox? 

Finn: “Before using Somnox, I just couldn’t get to sleep and was sometimes still wide awake after 2 hours. Every night I was tossing and turning and just couldn’t clear my head. That’s why I couldn’t get to sleep.”

Finn’s mother Karin adds: “He used to reflect endlessly on the things that happened during the day. He would still be awake late at night, and when we used to go up to bed ourselves, we would hear him shout “Sleep tight!” from his room.”

“Before using Somnox, I just couldn’t get to sleep and was sometimes still wide awake after 2 hours.”

How did you find out about Somnox?

Karin has spent a considerable time searching the Internet for anything to aid Finn with his sleeping difficulties. “You don’t want to give your child sleeping drugs, so I was trying to find natural remedies.” She eventually came across the Somnox Breathe and Sleep Companion, which was given to Finn as a Christmas present. 

Finn: “I had seen clips of the Somnox Breathe and Sleep Companion and wanted to try it so badly. I couldn’t stop crying for over 15 minutes when I opened my present, that’s how happy I was! The first night we tried out all the buttons and sleeping positions. I used it properly the next night and when I did, I dozed straight off and had the best sleep I’d had in ages.” 

How does Somnox help you sleep?

Finn likes it when someone is close to him, so he doesn’t feel alone. Somnox can provide him this feeling of affection and closeness. Finn: ”It’s like you are lying against someone who is already asleep. This relaxes me and makes me feel safe.” His mother adds: “I think Somnox was a turning point for Finn. He used to lie awake overthinking and worrying. He sleeps so much better now. Wherever we go, so does Somnox, even on big trips.” 

”It’s like you are lying against someone who is already asleep. This relaxes me and makes me feel safe.”

How do you use Somnox?

Karin: “Finn only really uses ‘Somnox Sense’, as this makes the Breathe and Sleep Companion adjust itself to his own breathing pattern, which he enjoys the most.” Finn: “I copy the breathing pattern of the Somnox, just like I would do if I was lying next to mom or dad.”

“I copy the breathing pattern of the Somnox, just like I would do if I was lying next to mom or dad.”

Could Somox help other children as well?

By now Finn has both Somnox 1 and Somnox 2. He often lets other kids use Somnox 1. Karin: “One of our Somnoxes was loaned to an 8-year-old girl to try out. She could not sleep on her own and was always seeking close contact from her parents. Thanks to Somnox she can now fall asleep in her own bed. It’s not only amazing for her, but takes a ton of added pressure away from her parents as well.”

10-year-old Finn has been falling asleep easily for 2 years, thanks to Somnox

For anyone looking to improve their sleep, Somnox 2 is your science-backed sleep companion that guides you towards slow-paced breathing that helps you fall asleep faster, worry less and wake up rested. 70% of our users improved their sleep quality within 4 weeks. Interested? Sign up for early access.

5 Simple Breathing Exercises for Sleep

5 Simple Breathing Exercises for Sleep

Do you often find yourself lying in bed, staring at the ceiling, unable to fall asleep? Despite shutting off electronic devices at a reasonable hour, dousing your pillow in lavender essential oil, and taking a hot bath, your brain always seems to kick into high gear the second your head hits the pillow 

If this sounds familiar, don’t fret. Practicing simple breathing exercises for sleep can help calm your mind and body, making it easier to fall into a deep, restorative slumber.

In this article, we’ll be sharing five simple breathing exercises for sleep, but before we get into the how-to, let’s explore how breathing relates to sleep.  

For anyone looking to improve their sleep, Somnox 2 is your science-backed sleep companion that guides you towards slow-paced breathing that helps you fall asleep faster, worry less and wake up rested. 70% of our users improved their sleep quality within 4 weeks. Interested? Sign up for early access.

 

How Are Breathing and Sleep Connected?   

Your autonomic nervous system regulates many unconscious bodily functions, including heart rate, digestion, and breathing. It’s also responsible for triggering the “fight or flight” response, during which the body prepares to fight or flee a threat. When the fight or flight response is triggered, a person’s breathing becomes shallow and rapid to increase oxygen within the body.

This response served our ancestors well, as they periodically had to escape predators like lions, tigers, and bears. In today’s modern age, however, our lives are rarely in true danger. Instead, threats are things like work deadlines, relationship issues, and financial worries.

Although these things don’t threaten your life, your brain doesn’t know that, and treats all threats the same—whether physical or psychological, real or imagined—by stimulating your sympathetic nervous system.

Relaxed, diaphragmatic breathing is an antidote to an unbalanced autonomic nervous system. It activates your parasympathetic nervous system, also known as the “rest and digest” system while dialing down the activity of your sympathetic nervous system.[*]

Deep breathing essentially gives your brain a safety signal, telling it that it’s okay to let its guard down and relax. Once your brain relaxes, your body will follow suit, allowing you to easily drift off into a restful sleep.

 

Simple Breathing Exercises for Sleep 

While breathing is largely an unconscious process that’s controlled by your brain stem, you can consciously change your breathing rate to facilitate sleep. Here are a few simple breathing exercises for sleep that you can try tonight.

 

4-7-8 Breathing

 The 4-7-8 method is a breathing technique developed by Dr. Andrew Weil, who describes it as a “natural tranquilizer for the nervous system.

To practice 4-7-8 breathing, simply follow these steps:

  1. Exhale completely through your mouth with a “whoosh” sound.
  2. Close your mouth and inhale through your nose for a count of four, ensuring that you’re breathing into your stomach, rather than your chest.
  3. Hold your breath for a count of seven.
  4. Exhale through your mouth for a count of eight with a “whoosh” sound.
  5. Repeat this cycle until you drift off to sleep.

 

Count Your Breaths

Counting your breaths is a meditative and grounding practice that can soothe your mind and body, as well as take your mind off anxiety-inducing thoughts.

To practice, follow these simple steps:

  1. Begin with a few rounds of diaphragmatic breathing in and out through your nose.
  2. Establish a slow pattern of breathing for about a minute.
  3. As you exhale, count “one” to yourself.
  4. On the next exhale, count “two,” and so on up to “five.”  
  5. When you get to “five,” count back down to “one.”
  6. Continue until you start dozing off.

 

Inflate the Balloon

Visualization is a powerful tool that can help prepare your mind and body for sleep. While there are endless visualization techniques, the following one is particularly helpful for encouraging you to breathe deeply from your diaphragm, rather than engaging in stress-induced shallow breathing.

To practice this visualization, follow these simple steps:

  1. Begin with a few rounds of diaphragmatic breathing in and out through your nose.
  2. Establish a slow pattern of breathing for about a minute.
  3. As you inhale, visualize your abdomen as a balloon that’s inflating with air.
  4. As you exhale, visualize the balloon slowly deflating, as the air releases.
  5. You can even imagine the balloon as your favorite color, or that you’re floating in the sky.
  6. Continue until your eyes feel heavy and you fall asleep.

 

Diaphragmatic Breathing with Somnox

Somnox is a jelly-bean-shaped companion that uses robotic technology to help you fall asleep faster, sleep deeper, and wake up refreshed. This science-backed sleep companion expands and deflates as if it’s taking deep, relaxing belly breaths. 

Simply holding the breathe and sleep companion unconsciously encourages you to adopt the same slowed-down breathing rhythm. This, in turn, stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, which puts you in a state that’s more conducive to sleep.

To use Somnox for sleep, follow these steps:

  1. Turn on Somnox 2. Within minutes, you’ll subconsciously adopt its calm breathing pattern.
  2. Smart sensors respond to your breathing in real-time, matching your rhythm and gradually adjusting it to the ideal rate.
  3. Fall asleep, stay asleep, and wake up feeling peaceful and rested.

Seventy percent of Somnox users report improved sleep quality within four weeks. 

 

Alternate Nostril Breathing

Alternate nostril breathing, also known as nadi shodhana pranayama, is a yogic breath control practice. While it might take a minute to get the hang of it, research shows that this practice may lower stress, enabling you to fall asleep faster.[*

To practice alternate nostril breathing, follow these steps:

  1. Raise your hand to your nose, as if you were going to pinch your nose shut with your thumb and pointer fingers. 
  2. Exhale fully and then close your right nostril with your thumb.
  3. Inhale through your left nostril.
  4. Open your right nostril and exhale through it, while closing your left nostril with your pointer finger.
  5. Continue this rotation for five minutes.

 

Breathing for Better Sleep

Your breath is the most powerful tool you have to support better sleep. Decades of research has shown that deep, diaphragmatic breathing can calm the racing thoughts that are often the culprit behind restless nights.[*][*] 

The next time you find yourself tossing and turning, try practicing one of the above breathing exercises for sleep. You just might be surprised by how quickly you’re able to drift off into dreamland.

For anyone looking to improve their sleep, Somnox 2 is your science-backed sleep companion that guides you towards slow-paced breathing that helps you fall asleep faster, worry less and wake up rested. 70% of our users improved their sleep quality within 4 weeks. Interested? Sign up for early access.

Can You Improve Your Breathing Rate While You Sleep?

Can You Improve Your Breathing Rate While You Sleep?

When you’re not sleeping well, does anything else matter? There’s nothing more frustrating than lying awake at night watching the clock. 

One secret to achieving more restful slumber? Focus on achieving a healthy breathing rate while you sleep. 

Most of us don’t spend too much time wondering whether our vital signs are in the normal range, but if you’re struggling to get quality sleep, it’s time to take a look. Our vital signs include measurements of health like blood pressure, pulse rate, and breathing rate (also known as your respiratory rate). Your breathing rate refers to how many times you breathe in a minute.

When your breathing rate during sleep becomes too fast or too slow, you may find that it’s hard to stay asleep. You might also wake up feeling tired. 

Why? Because our breathing is closely linked with our sleep quality.[*] To start getting more restorative sleep, take a deep breath and read on. 

For anyone looking to improve their sleep, Somnox 2 is your science-backed sleep companion that guides you towards slow-paced breathing that helps you fall asleep faster, worry less and wake up rested. 70% of our users improved their sleep quality within 4 weeks. Interested? Sign up for early access.

 

How We Breathe During Sleep

A number of changes take place in our bodies when we sleep, including how we breathe. First, our breathing rate tends to slow down and become more constant during periods of rest and sleep. This is because our metabolic rate decreases during sleep, and a slower metabolic rate leads to slower breathing. Our other vital signs like heart rate and blood pressure go down during sleep as well.[*

Our muscles also relax during sleep, including our respiratory muscles. The result is a slower breathing rate because the muscles around the lungs are not working as hard as they normally do when we are awake.[*

The stage of sleep also affects our breathing rate during sleep. Most of us experience fragmented sleep with different phases and awakenings throughout the night. There are 4 stages of sleep, and our breathing changes as we enter each one. 

Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is divided into 3 stages, and the breathing rate is typically constant. During stages 1 and 2, our bodies are in a state of light sleep, and the heart rate begins to decrease. As we enter NREM stage 3, our bodies relax more fully, and breathing starts to slow down. During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, our brains become more active, and breathing tends to be more irregular. The average breathing rate during REM sleep is usually a bit lower than in NREM sleep or wakefulness.[*

 

What’s a Good Breathing Rate During Sleep?

Healthy vital signs like your respiratory rate during sleep vary with age and health. For adults, a good breathing rate at rest is 12 to 20 breaths per minute.[*

A 2016 study found that the average breathing rate for adults without a respiratory condition was about 15 to 16 breaths per minute. This was true in all phases of sleep including both REM and NREM. In this study, the breathing rate during sleep was only slightly slower than the average awake breathing rate of 17 breaths per minute.[*]

 

How to Measure Breathing Rate During Sleep

You may be curious about your own breathing rate during sleep. How can you know if you’re in the healthy range? There are a few different ways for adults to measure respiration during sleep, including:

  • Manual counting: One way to measure your breathing rate during sleep is for your partner or friend to watch you while you rest (sounds creepy but it works). By counting how many times your chest rises and falls in a minute, they can measure your respiration rate. 
  • Wearable devices: Smartphones, smartwatches, and other wearable devices can be worn at night to measure your breathing rate during sleep and notify you of any irregularities.[*
  • Smart Breathing technology: The Somnox 2 monitors your breathing rate overnight and responds to your breathing in real-time, actively slowing down your breathing rate and helping you to calm down.

 

Conditions that Lead to Abnormal Respiration 

Several chronic health conditions can affect your breathing rate during sleep. It’s important to know the warning signs.

  • Obstructive sleep apnea: This type of disordered breathing occurs when the upper airway becomes blocked during sleep. 
  • Central sleep apnea: Individuals with central sleep apnea experience paused breathing during sleep because their brains do not send the message to the respiratory muscles that it is time to breathe. 
  • Cardiovascular disease: Research shows that individuals who have or are at risk of cardiovascular disease are more likely to experience disordered breathing during sleep.[*]
  • Asthma: When individuals with asthma lie flat on their backs during sleep, their lung capacity goes down significantly. This makes it difficult for the body to sustain a normal breathing rate during sleep.[*]
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): COPD refers to a group of chronic lung conditions that block airflow to the lungs. 
  • High body mass index (BMI): Having a high BMI has been linked to a higher risk of sleep apnea.[*]
  • Mental health: Irregular breathing during sleep has been linked with mental health challenges like anxiety and depression. A 2015 study found that sleep apnea may raise the risk of developing a panic disorder.[*]
  • Pneumonia: Pneumonia is a lung infection that causes the air sacs in the lungs to become inflamed. This makes breathing more difficult and lowers one’s lung capacity.[*]
  • Narcotic use or abuse: Narcotic medications cause our respiratory rate to slow down and become more shallow. This is especially true during sleep.[*]

 

When Should I Talk to My Doctor?

Good sleep is vital to your health and quality of life. If you experience any of the following  symptoms during or after sleep, consider discussing them with yourdoctor:[*]

  • Snoring every night
  • Restless sleep
  • Morning headaches
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Trouble remembering or thinking clearly throughout the day

 

Tips for Healthy Respiration During Sleep

A healthy breathing rate is essential to getting restorative sleep. Fortunately, there are simple steps that you can start taking tonight to improve your quality of sleep (and life!).

To improve your breathing rate while you sleep, try incorporating one or more of the following tips:

  • Sleeping position: Sleeping on your side can increase your lung capacity and improve your breathing pattern.[*]
  • Avoid allergens: To improve the air quality in your bedroom, consider investing in an air purifier to remove bacteria and allergens from your environment.[*]
  • Breathing support: To deepen and improve your breathing rate during sleep, try the Somnox 2 (it breathes with you!).

For anyone looking to improve their sleep, Somnox 2 is your science-backed sleep companion that guides you towards slow-paced breathing that helps you fall asleep faster, worry less and wake up rested. 70% of our users improved their sleep quality within 4 weeks. Interested? Sign up for early access.

7 Health Benefits of Deep Breathing

7 Health Benefits of Deep Breathing

Take a deep breath and see how you feel. If you notice your muscles relaxing and your thoughts slowing down, there’s a reason for that. Deep breathing has several health benefits that can lift your mood and improve your quality of life.[*

Performing deep breathing exercises is a simple way to start taking care of your health. When you have a chronic health condition or simply want to make some improvements, it can be overwhelming to know where to start. 

Start with deep breathing. It’s free, can be done at any time, and doesn’t have side effects like medications. To start easing stress and improving your health, read on to learn the health benefits of deep breathing. 

 

What Is Deep Breathing?

Deep breathing, also known as diaphragmatic breathing, means taking slow, deep breaths on purpose. Diaphragmatic breathing involves the small muscle under the lungs known as the diaphragm. 

When you take a deep breath in, the diaphragm contracts and moves down to make room for the lungs to fill with air. When you breathe out and empty the lungs, the diaphragm relaxes and moves back up.[*

Deep breathing stimulates the vagus nerve, a system of nerves that run from the brain down to the large intestine. The vagus nerve controls involuntary functions in the body like your mood, immune system, digestive system, and heart rate. By stimulating the vagus nerve, deep breathing leads to relaxation and health benefits.[*

 

How Deep Breathing Works 

Deep breathing allows our bodies to relax because it helps to regulate the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system is responsible for our “fight or flight” response and causes an increase in heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, and muscle tension. When the sympathetic nervous system is activated, it’s common to feel irritable and anxious as well.

When you take a deep breath and stimulate the vagus nerve, your parasympathetic nervous system is activated. As opposed to the “fight or flight” response, the parasympathetic nervous system causes a “rest and digest” response. When you trigger this system, your breathing rate, heart rate, and blood pressure all start to come down. You may also notice that you start to feel more like yourself and can think more clearly.

 

7 Benefits of Deep Breathing 

From a better mood to lowered blood pressure, deep breathing can improve your health in a variety of ways.[*]

Relieve Stress

Chronic stress affects just about every aspect of our health. It’s estimated that up to 60% to 80% of patient visits to primary healthcare providers are related to stress. Emotional stress has been linked to a higher number of office visits and incidence of disease.[*]

A 2017 study found that regular deep breathing practices can lead to an overall increased mood and lower stress level. Study participants experienced lower heart rates and cortisol levels after breathing deeply.[*] Cortisol, known as the stress hormone, has been linked with increased levels of inflammation and disease in the body.[*

Decrease Blood Pressure

Deep breathing has been found to lower blood pressure and help to prevent high blood pressure (hypertension).[*

A 2019 review found that deep breathing can produce a moderate decrease in blood pressure readings. The researchers suggested that deep breathing could be an effective first step in treating hypertension, especially for individuals who are hesitant to take medication to treat it.[*]

Reduce Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal condition that causes constipation, diarrhea, stomach pain, and cramping. IBS greatly affects one’s quality of life, and the symptoms can be triggered by stress. 

A 2020 study found that a daily deep breathing practice can improve IBS symptoms. The study also found that participants who took part in the deep breathing program reported improved moods and higher quality of life.[*]

Improve Chronic Pain

The way we breathe affects how the brain processes pain signals. Taking deep breaths has been shown to change the way the brain perceives pain and lowers the intensity. Deep breathing can also improve feelings of tension, anger, and depression in those who experience chronic pain.[*]

Improve Posture and Strength

Breathing deeply can help to strengthen the posture muscles in the body. A small 2017 study found that participating in a daily deep breathing program improved the posture of study participants.[*] Sitting upright provides more room for the lungs to breathe, so an improved posture can make breathing deeply feel easier.

Improve Lung Function in Asthma 

Asthma is a chronic lung condition that causes the airways to become inflamed and tightened. A 2020 Cochrane review concluded that regular deep breathing exercises can improve lung function in individuals with asthma. Not surprisingly, when people with asthma experienced better lung function, they also reported an increased quality of life.[*] Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may experience the same benefits from deep breathing as well.[*]

Improve Cardiac Surgery Outcomes

Deep breathing is an important part of the recovery process after surgery. A 2015 study found daily deep breathing reduces the risk of complications after cardiac surgery.[*

 

How to Practice Deep Breathing

Although deep breathing is a simple practice, it takes effort and concentration to do it every day. To get started, find a comfortable place where you can relax and close your eyes. Try lying down and placing one hand on your chest and one hand on your abdomen. 

To begin diaphragmatic breathing, first, breathe out to empty your lungs. Next, take a deep breath in through your nose and feel your lungs expanding. If you’re doing it right, you’ll see both your chest and abdomen rise.

Once you have filled your lungs with air, exhale through your mouth (or your nose if you prefer) and notice your abdomen move down again. Try to blow out all of the air in your lungs, and then start again. 

While you are practicing deep breathing, you may notice your mind starting to wander. This is normal. Try to avoid judging yourself for this, and simply keep bringing your thoughts back to your breath. 

If you could use some more support in your deep breathing practice, consider using the Somnox 2 It breathes with you to help you breathe more deeply and evenly.

To begin a daily deep breathing practice, create a routine that works for you. Set aside a small corner of your home with everything you need. You may want to have a pillow to rest on, a clock or timer to keep track of the time, and the Somnox 2 to help guide your breathing pattern. 

As an extra motivational nudge, try setting a reminder on your phone or computer. Aim for one or two sessions per day to start and work your way up from there. Schedule time for deep breathing before bed and any stressful situations throughout the day. Once you develop the habit of deep breathing, you’ll likely notice the benefits right away.

The Process of Breathing Explained

The Process of Breathing Explained

Breathing is something we do all day and night without even realizing it. In fact, we breathe in and out about 17,000 times a day.[*] Despite being such an inherent part of our existence, many people don’t understand the breathing process or even know why breathing is so essential to life.

In this article, we’ll be taking a deep dive into breathing, exploring how it works and why it’s important, as well as different types of breathing and tips for healthy breathing.

Let’s all take a deep breath—in and out—and get started. 

For anyone looking to improve their sleep, Somnox 2 is your science-backed sleep companion that guides you towards slow-paced breathing that helps you fall asleep faster, worry less and wake up rested. 70% of our users improved their sleep quality within 4 weeks. Interested? Sign up for early access.

How the Respiratory System Works

The respiratory system is the network of organs and tissues that allow you to breathe. The two lungs, which sit to the left and right of the heart, are the primary organs of the respiratory system.[*]

 The breathing process (aka respiration) has two major phases: inhalation and exhalation. The inhalation process starts when the diaphragm, the muscle located under your lungs, contracts and moves downward. This increases space in your chest cavity, which allows your lungs to expand.

 As your lungs inflate, air enters your nose or mouth and travels down your windpipe to your bronchial tubes, which connect your windpipe to your lungs. As the air reaches your lungs, it enters air sacs called alveoli, which pass the oxygen into your bloodstream.

 When you exhale, your diaphragm relaxes and shifts up into your chest cavity. As the space in your chest cavity decreases, carbon dioxide-rich air is pushed out of your lungs and windpipe, and then out of your nose or mouth.  

 

Respiratory system 

 

How Your Body Controls Breathing

Inhalation is an active process, meaning muscles are involved. Most of the work of inhalation is done by the diaphragm, the main breathing muscle, and to a lesser extent, the intercostal muscles.

Exhalation, on the other hand, is a passive process, meaning no muscle activity is involved. Exhalation is caused by the natural elastic recoil of the lung tissue and is accompanied by the relaxation of all breathing muscles—similar to a balloon deflating.

While you can consciously inhale and exhale at will, breathing is largely an unconscious process that’s controlled by your brain stem.[*] The brainstem connects the brain to the spinal cord and regulates many automatic bodily processes, including heart rate, blood pressure, reflexes, and breathing.

Your brainstem controls your breathing rate by sensing your body’s need for oxygen, as well as its need to get rid of carbon dioxide, which is a byproduct of cellular respiration. 

 

The Importance of Breathing

Just like food and water, breathing is essential for life. However, while you can go days without water and possibly weeks without food, you can only go a few minutes without breathing.

Why is that? What purpose does breathing serve? The critical nature of breathing is directly linked to the importance of one particular element your body needs every second of every day: oxygen. 

Air contains 21 percent oxygen, which you breathe into your lungs.[*] Once inhaled, your lungs pass the oxygen toyour bloodstream, where it’s carried off to your tissues and organs. The cells that make up your tissues and organs then use the oxygen to perform functions that keep you alive.  

Breathing also serves as a way to expel carbon dioxide gas, which is a byproduct of cellular respiration. 

 

Calm mind at the beach

 

How Intentional Breathing Can Support Your Body

While breathing is a largely automatic process, you can consciously influence your breathing rate whenever and wherever you’d like.

Intentionally altering your breathing rate allows you to indirectly influence your autonomic nervous system. This is really exciting if you think about it! Consciously slowing your breathing increases the activity of the parasympathetic nervous system (aka “rest and digest”) while reducing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system (aka “fight or flight”).

The parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for the relaxation response and triggers beneficial changes in the body, including a slowed heart rate and reduced blood pressure. When this system is activated, your autonomic nervous system is balanced, which relieves you of anxiety, overwhelm, and restlessness.  

In this way, you can use your breath as a tool to calm your body and mind. Research suggests that deep breathing practices can, among other things, soothe anxiety and support restful sleep.[*][*]

To think about it another way, taking deep, diaphragmatic breaths communicates to your brain, “Everything is okay. It’s safe to relax,” in a language it understands. 

While diaphragmatic breathing doesn’t require anything but your breath, you can further support your breathing practice with the Somnox 2 Breathe & Sleep Robot, which uses the power of breathing to calm the mind and prepare you for a good night’s sleep.

By simply holding the Somnox 2, you can physically feel a calm breathing rhythm. This will (unconsciously) encourage you to adopt the same soothing rhythm.

 

Tips for Healthy Breathing

There are several other things you can do to support healthy breathing and, consequently, a healthier you: 

  • Quit smoking (or don’t start if you don’t smoke). As the number one risk factor of lung cancer and other lung diseases, taking steps to quit smoking is essential.[*] Also, try your best to avoid secondhand smoke. 
  • Keep active. Regular aerobic exercise strengthens the lungs and keeps them healthy. Aim to get 150 minutes of aerobic exercise per week.
  • Maintain a healthy weight: Being overweight increases a person’s risk of breathing difficulties.[*] In addition to exercising, maintain a nutritious diet to support a healthy weight.
  • Limit exposure to air pollution. Indoor and outdoor air can contain particles and pollutants that damage your lungs. To keep your lungs healthy, maintain a clean home and stay inside on days when the outdoor air is unhealthy. You can check the outdoor air quality where you live by visiting airnow.gov.  
  • Practice diaphragmatic breathing exercises. Diaphragmatic breathing exercises will not only help reduce your stress, but can also help strengthen your lungs and diaphragm and make them more efficient.[*]

 

Breathe Better to Live Better

Breathing is a truly incredible process that we depend on for life. It brings oxygen into our bodies, expels carbon dioxide, and can even be harnessed to relieve stress, anxiety, and sleeplessness.

Breathing isn’t something we often consciously think about, but hopefully after reading this article, you have a greater appreciation for your respiratory system and a better understanding of the superpower that’s available within all of us

For anyone looking to improve their sleep, Somnox 2 is your science-backed sleep companion that guides you towards slow-paced breathing that helps you fall asleep faster, worry less and wake up rested. 70% of our users improved their sleep quality within 4 weeks. Interested? Sign up for early access.